FoodStuff

The stuff we eat and drink is part daily necessity and part cultural identity. Every mouthful represents millennia of human collaboration and innovation. On FoodStuff, Anney and Lauren bite into the juicy stories – and science – behind everything that nourishes us.


This seemingly simple mix of whiskey, vermouth, and bitters with a cherry garnish has been interpreted infinite ways over its 140-year lifetime. Anney and Lauren take on the history & science of the Manhattan. Plus: a PSA (podcast service announcement).

Even though gold has no flavor and no nutritional benefits, people have been eating gold pretty much forever. Anney and Lauren mine the AUdacious ancient and modern practice of consuming gold.

FoodStuff has big news: We're relaunching as Savor! Hosts Anney and Lauren are going on the road with Producer Dylan to interview culinary creators and consumers about how they eat – and why – starting 9/26. (Our RSS feed isn't changing, just our name!)

Even though it's a cold case, the origin story of the ice cream sundae is hotly debated. Anney and Lauren have the scoop on the competing tales behind ice cream sundaes.

Pickled cucumbers were Cleopatra's favorite beauty food and the main business of the guy who named the Americas. Anney and Lauren explore the long history and bacteria-laden science of pickles.

Plums have played a major role in cultures' arts and diets for millennia, all around the world. Anney and Lauren plumb the science and history of this seriously multipurpose fruit.

Putting lots of food on a long table isn't new, but the all-you-can-eat buffet restaurant is a very 20th-century, very American concept. Anney and Lauren explore the history and science of going your own way with the buffet.

Celery stalks, leaves, roots, and seeds are part of countless cuisines today, but the ribs were once considered such a fancy treat that folks displayed them in vases. Anney & Lauren dig into the history and science of celery.

Cheetos and other cheesy puffed-corn snacks are miracles of modern science and marketing. Anney and Lauren dig into the fortuitously fab history (and making of) cheese puffs.

Pepperoni is a sausage that's difficult to divorce from its primary partner, American pizza. Anney & Lauren explore the history of this Italian-American invention, plus explain how the sausage is made.

The neon-red cherries of our childhood bear little resemblance to the original maraschino cherries. Anney and Lauren take a pitiless look at the science and history, including how the classic type is making a comeback.

Should you find yourself in an unfamiliar star system without your copy of 'The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy', this episode will help fill you in on the local fare, from perfectly normal beast sandwiches to pan galactic gargle blasters. 

After water, tea is the second most popular drink in the world -- and every cup is steeped in history. Anney and Lauren explore the health, production, and origins of tea.

Fettuccine Alfredo may seem like an Americanized dish, but it was created by a real Italian chef -- it even bears his name. Christopher Hassiotis joins us for this bonus episode about the origins of Alfredo.

The seemingly humble garden pea has soil superpowers, caused a medieval craze, and drove Orson Welles to distraction. Come along with Anney and Lauren as they give world peas a chance.

Cruise ships are something between floating hotels and luxury battleships, but the food served on them doesn't have the best reputation. Anney and Lauren go overboard exploring how cruise food works and how cruise lines are working to change that rep.

Why do we shape gingerbread cookies into people and houses? Why is it generally considered a winter treat? Anney and Lauren tackle gingerbread (in all its formats) head first.

For a simple fish, the cod played a huge role in Europe's colonization of North America. Anney & Lauren dive into the story of the fish that changed the course of history in this episode of FoodStuff.

From their holy beginnings to massive modern success, we explore the twisting history of vending machines -- plus how they can tell real money from counterfeit (and why they're so darn stubborn sometimes).

Though it's a fairly recent invention, tea time is a meal with very specific etiquette and traditions. Historian Dr. Julia Skinner joins us to discuss how this came about, how it’s changed over the years, and why you should keep your pinkie in.

This Vietnamese soup-and-noodle dish can (and does!) take on infinite forms and formats, but at its core, it's a hearty comfort food. Anney and Lauren dig into the rich history of phở.

Because food is so often featured in fairy tales and fantasy stories, Anney & Lauren offer up a dramatic reading of Christina Rossetti's 'Goblin Market', along with commentary and special guests Robert Lamb & Joe McCormick. Come buy, y'all, come buy. 

Sometimes called the tropical potato, is breadfruit the greatest thing since sliced bread? What's mutiny got to do with it? Join Anney and Lauren as they get a loaf of breadfruit. 

From a simple rum punch to a frozen neon monstrosity to a call for mindfulness, the daiquiri is a cocktail with as many definitions as it has drinkers. Anney and Lauren dive into the winding history of the daiquiri.

Lauren and Anney would like to introduce you to Committed. Join host Jo Piazza as she delves into the hilarious, heartbreaking and inspiring stories of couples of all kinds who’ve soldiered through unimaginable circumstances, and after the longest of days, still want to wake up next to one another in the morning.